November Issue Brief: Teacher Retention

Teachers have long been identified as the number one in-school factor that influences student outcomes. Conversely, teacher turnover is correlated with lower student outcomes and contributes to school cultures where churn and instability prevent positive change from taking root. How to retain teachers, and especially teachers of color, has emerged as a key area of Read more about November Issue Brief: Teacher Retention[…]

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How to Build Culturally Affirming Schools, According to Over 100 Black Teachers

Recruiting a diverse staff and building a “family-like” school culture are among the key action steps more than 100 Black educators recommend school leaders follow in a recent report released by Teach Plus and the Center for Black Educator Development. The paper presented the findings of focus groups conducted during the spring and summer of Read more about How to Build Culturally Affirming Schools, According to Over 100 Black Teachers[…]

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State Efforts to Promote Equitable Access to Effective Teachers

In recent years, federal education programs and policies have increasingly focused on teacher quality as a means for closing achievement gaps, in part by directing states to measure teacher qualifications and performance and to promote equitable access to qualified and effective teachers among schools within a district. A new report by Andrew Wayne, Courtney Tanenbaum, Read more about State Efforts to Promote Equitable Access to Effective Teachers[…]

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Rethinking Teacher Certification to Employ K-12 Adjunct Teachers

Recently, AIR published a report from Keri Ingraham, fellow at Discovery Institute, focused on the possibility of using adjunct teachers for K-12 classrooms for limited roles. Excerpts from this intriguing piece appear below: Trends in higher education tend to trickle down to K–12 schools over time. In the K–12 setting, adjunct teachers could be hired Read more about Rethinking Teacher Certification to Employ K-12 Adjunct Teachers[…]

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Right From the Start: D.C.’s Groundbreaking Teacher Hiring Strategy

The District of Columbia Public Schools is well-known for its comprehensive teacher-evaluation and performance-based compensation systems. But an equally important component of the district’s work to strengthen its teaching workforce has been a systematic, data-driven approach to hiring the strongest candidates in the first place. Known as TeachDC, the system employs a multi-step process for Read more about Right From the Start: D.C.’s Groundbreaking Teacher Hiring Strategy[…]

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September Issue Brief: Teacher Leadership

There is no doubt that teachers exert an incredible influence on students and their learning. But what if teachers hold the key to school and district-wide reform as well?  In Core Education’s September Issue Brief, we explore the many ways schools and districts are offering exceptional teachers opportunities to share their knowledge and extend their Read more about September Issue Brief: Teacher Leadership[…]

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Smart Money 2.0

The National Council on Teacher Quality recently released a report by Patricia Saenz-Armstrong comparing the salary trajectories of teachers in 90 large school districts across the country. Excerpts from the piece appear below: “Teacher pay is low.” It has been said hundreds of thousands of times before. The search term “teacher pay is low” produces Read more about Smart Money 2.0[…]

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Using Transcription Analysis to Replace Traditional Classroom Observations

Writing for Fordham’s Flypaper, Amber Northern recently reviewed a new initiative that uses transcript analysis to promote teacher professional learning. Excerpts of the piece appear below: Traditional classroom observations are time and labor intensive, as they are meant to capture the many nuances of student-teacher interactions and thereby inform future practice. A recent paper from Read more about Using Transcription Analysis to Replace Traditional Classroom Observations[…]

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July Issue Brief: Teacher Wellness

Although almost everyone understands the importance of student well-being, there is much less consideration for the well-being of teachers themselves. Healthy educators are more productive, less likely to be absent, and better equipped to support student development when they themselves are mentally, physically, socially, and emotionally well. By creating opportunities and infrastructure for employee wellness Read more about July Issue Brief: Teacher Wellness[…]

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Accelerate, Don’t Remediate: New Evidence from Elementary Math Classrooms

Research suggests students have experienced more unfinished learning over the last year than ever before. With the COVID-19 pandemic waning, school systems are facing a critical choice about how to respond. Should they use the traditional approach of reviewing all the content students missed, known as remediation? Or should they start with the current grade’s Read more about Accelerate, Don’t Remediate: New Evidence from Elementary Math Classrooms[…]

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Inaugural PISA Data on Students’ Growth Mindset and Teaching Practices

Writing for the Fordham Institute,  Jeff Murray recently reviewed the results of a new Growth Mindset survey administered for the first time with the 2018 PISA assessment. Excerpts of the piece appear below: For the 2018 administration of the test, PISA included a “growth mindset” instrument. Students who have this mindset believe that intelligence is Read more about Inaugural PISA Data on Students’ Growth Mindset and Teaching Practices[…]

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Overcoming Challenges of Concurrent Learning

Many schools are using a simultaneous learning approach, where teachers work with all students, both in person and online, at the same time. However, writes The 74 contributor Beth Rabbitt, despite hard work and good intentions, full-time, simultaneous learning is not a best practice.  Online models are least effective when teachers try to engage learners Read more about Overcoming Challenges of Concurrent Learning[…]

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Staffing Innovations from the Pandemic

Recently in The Hill, Thomas Toch and Lynn Olson, both of FutureEd, reflected on staffing innovations that are emerging as promising practices amid the pandemic. Excerpts from the piece appear below: One reason distance learning has been such a harrowing experience during the pandemic is that most schools merely shifted the traditional teaching model to Read more about Staffing Innovations from the Pandemic[…]

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A Teacher’s View: Remote Teaching Doesn’t Feel Like Teaching. Six Steps Toward Putting the Nuance Back Into Classroom Interactions

Recently in The 74, Nat Damon, a 25-year educator and author of Time to Teach: Time to Reach reflected on how to put the nuance into virtual teaching. Excerpts of the piece appear below: Remote teaching does not feel like teaching. This is not the same as saying remote teaching is not teaching. It absolutely Read more about A Teacher’s View: Remote Teaching Doesn’t Feel Like Teaching. Six Steps Toward Putting the Nuance Back Into Classroom Interactions[…]

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REL West Resources on Independent Learning

During the current COVID-19 global health crisis and shift to distance learning, students are being asked to do more independent work—reading, writing, and problem solving—outside of their time in class. School and district leaders in the West have expressed a need for teachers to have access to user-friendly, research-based guidance on effective ways to design Read more about REL West Resources on Independent Learning[…]

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Stress Tops the Reasons Why Public School Teachers Quit

The COVID-19 pandemic has added more stress to an already high-stress profession: American public school teacher. The authors of a new report by RAND share the results of a survey of nearly 1,000 former public school teachers and reveal how important stress has been—even more so than pay—to teachers’ decisions to leave the profession. In Read more about Stress Tops the Reasons Why Public School Teachers Quit[…]

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