The Power of Expectations in District and Charter Schools

Now that the most acute phase of the Covid crisis is over, public conversation has turned to the millions of students who are still struggling academically and emotionally—and how our nation’s schools ought to respond. Decisions that education leaders make right now will determine whether this generation of students recovers or continues to lose ground. Read more about The Power of Expectations in District and Charter Schools[…]

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Using Predicted Academic Performance to Identify At-Risk Students in Public Schools

Ed Working Papers has released a new paper by Ishtiaque Fazlul, Cory Koedel, and Eric Parsons focused on ways to use data to identify at-risk students. This paper offers a promising look at new ways to identify students early so that they can receive timely intervention. Measures of student disadvantage—or risk—are critical components of equity-focused Read more about Using Predicted Academic Performance to Identify At-Risk Students in Public Schools[…]

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Are Two Teachers Better Than One?

Education Next recently published a piece from Nathan Jones and Marcus A. Winters exploring the research on the effect of co-teaching on students with and without disabilities. Excerpts from the piece appear below: For nearly 50 years, special education law has mandated that students with disabilities be served in the “least restrictive environment” possible. This Read more about Are Two Teachers Better Than One?[…]

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Should schools group students by ability?

Writing for the Fordham Institute, Scott J. Peters and Jonathan Plucker recently reviewed the research on student ability grouping in middle and high schools. Excerpts from the piece appear below: One of the most contentious debates in American education focuses on whether to group students into classrooms using some measure of prior achievement. Whole class Read more about Should schools group students by ability?[…]

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The state of learning loss: 7 takeaways from the latest data

Writing for Chalkbeat, Matt Barnum explores the takeaways from the latest data on pandemic learning loss. Excerpts from the piece appear below:  In the last year, students in younger grades have recovered between 15% and 35% of the learning they had lost, according to data released by the testing group NWEA. That’s the good news, Read more about The state of learning loss: 7 takeaways from the latest data[…]

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Harvard Economist Offers Gloomy Forecast on Reversing Pandemic Learning Loss

Along with collaborators from Dartmouth, the CALDER Center at the American Institutes for Research, and the nonprofit testing group NWEA, Harvard economist Tom Kane released a paper this May incorporating pre- and post-pandemic testing data from over 2 million students in 49 states. Its conclusion: Remote instruction was a “primary driver of widening achievement gaps” Read more about Harvard Economist Offers Gloomy Forecast on Reversing Pandemic Learning Loss[…]

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Restoring Pandemic Losses will Require Major Changes in Schools and Classrooms, Superintendents Say

Though kids are learning this year, many have fallen even further behind grade level. A new report from Brookings, written by Paul Hill and Kate Destler, draws from a national survey of school districts and in-depth interviews with six school districts. Highlights from the piece appear below:  Many school and district leaders had hoped to Read more about Restoring Pandemic Losses will Require Major Changes in Schools and Classrooms, Superintendents Say[…]

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Learning More: Why did U.S. schools make so much progress in the 1990s and early 2000s?

In the New York Times newsletter, David Leonhardt works against bad-news bias and covers a positive and mostly overlooked trend in American education: the educational progress of the 1990s and early 2000s. Excerpts of the piece appear below: For years, you’ve probably been hearing that our schools are in crisis. And K-12 education in the Read more about Learning More: Why did U.S. schools make so much progress in the 1990s and early 2000s?[…]

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The forgotten 20 percent: Achievement and growth in rural schools across the nation

NWEA recently released new research using data from over 2,300 rural schools across the US providing unique insight into math and reading achievement of students in rural schools. Key findings and recommendations from the report appear below:  KEY FINDINGS  • Kindergarten math and reading achievement is slightly higher in rural than non-rural schools, but by Read more about The forgotten 20 percent: Achievement and growth in rural schools across the nation[…]

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The Time Has Come for Truly Personalized Learning — With a Navigator to Make Sure Each Child Succeeds

Writing for The 74, Paul Reville and Geoffrey Canada recently made the case that it is time for truly personalized learning for students. Excerpts of the piece appear below:  We believe the time has come for every child to have a success plan and a navigator, a caring adult to act as their advocate for Read more about The Time Has Come for Truly Personalized Learning — With a Navigator to Make Sure Each Child Succeeds[…]

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Still Rising: Charter School Enrollment and Student Achievement at the Metropolitan Level

In the wake of the biggest education crisis in living memory, the need for transformational change is palpable and urgent. Accordingly, a new report from the Fordham Institute takes a fresh look at a question that is fundamental to the goals of many education reformers: Can a rising tide of charter schools carry students in Read more about Still Rising: Charter School Enrollment and Student Achievement at the Metropolitan Level[…]

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PROOF POINTS: Researchers blast data analysis for teachers to help students

Writing for the Hechinger Report, Jill Barshay surveyed the difficulties in providing data to teachers and expecting instructional improvement. Excerpts of the piece appear below:  Teachers are spending a lot of time talking about student data. In a 2016 survey by Harvard’s Center for Education Policy Research, 94 percent of middle school math teachers said Read more about PROOF POINTS: Researchers blast data analysis for teachers to help students[…]

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State Efforts to Promote Equitable Access to Effective Teachers

In recent years, federal education programs and policies have increasingly focused on teacher quality as a means for closing achievement gaps, in part by directing states to measure teacher qualifications and performance and to promote equitable access to qualified and effective teachers among schools within a district. A new report by Andrew Wayne, Courtney Tanenbaum, Read more about State Efforts to Promote Equitable Access to Effective Teachers[…]

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The Gifted Gap

Writing for The 74, Kevin Mahnken recently released a piece updating readers on The Gifted Gap, or the gap between talented Black and low-income students and their whiter, more affluent peers. Excerpts of the piece appear below: Efforts to improve the quality of American education often focus, implicitly or explicitly, on students who are achieving Read more about The Gifted Gap[…]

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The Overlooked

Over the past 18 months, the parents of an estimated 10.8 million students, or nearly one in five of the nation’s schoolchildren, did not get what they wanted from their child’s school, reports Bellwether Education Partners in a new report, “The Overlooked.” These families are not a monolith — they represent a diverse range of Read more about The Overlooked[…]

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Learner Agency: Students Driving their Own Learning

In the past year, more students have engaged in self-directed, independent learning than ever. One organization, Griptape, has been perfecting their approach to cultivating Learner Agency through their work with over 12,000 students during Learning Challenges since 2015.  After completing an application describing their passion project, selected students (teens ages 14-19, most of whom are Read more about Learner Agency: Students Driving their Own Learning[…]

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