ESSA Accountability: Don’t Forget the High Achievers

In the early days of the accountability movement, Jeb Bush’s Florida developed an innovative approach to evaluating school quality. First, the state looked at individual student progress over time—making it one of the first to do so. Then it put special emphasis on the gains (or lack thereof) of the lowest-performing kids in the state. Read more about ESSA Accountability: Don’t Forget the High Achievers[…]

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ESEA Reauthorized – FINALLY!

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), first created under President Lyndon Johnson in 1965, was the first major federal effort to provide funding and policy guidance to states to address the education needs of low-income and minority children and support the intent of Brown v. Board of Education. Today, The Every Child Succeeds Act, the Read more about ESEA Reauthorized – FINALLY![…]

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Arne Duncan Stepping Down as Education Secretary

At a crucial moment with the best possibility of an ESEA re-authorization on the near horizon and with only about one year left before the end of the Obama administration, long-serving Education Secretary Arne Duncan has stepped down. It is unclear why, but we do know that the President wanted Duncan to finish the course: Read more about Arne Duncan Stepping Down as Education Secretary[…]

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Pacts Americana from Bellwether Education

As we continue to go forward with no ESEA re-authorization to replace No Child Left Behind and as states continue to make the news for their gripes with Common Core, Bellwether Education has a new plan to bring more bi-partisan support to education reform. They call it “Pacts Americana”. This project and report re-envisions federal Read more about Pacts Americana from Bellwether Education[…]

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ESEA’s 50-Year Legacy: Blending Idealism, Policy Tensions

In honor of the fact that the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was passed 50 years ago this month, Alyson Klein at Education Week has a lengthy article out describing its legacy and the current challenges related to passing a re-authorization of the bill (whose most recent version was passed in 2001-2002 as No Read more about ESEA’s 50-Year Legacy: Blending Idealism, Policy Tensions[…]

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What Do the Elections Mean for Education?

Whiteboard Advisors have gathered the predictions of Education Insiders related to what will happen with education policy in the wake of the  recent midterm elections. Education Insiders express slight optimism that both K12 and higher education policies will become higher priorities with Republican control of the Senate, though agreement between the President and Congress is Read more about What Do the Elections Mean for Education?[…]

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Teachers Happier with NCLB Than Many Would Think

A new comprehensive research study, first available from the journal Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, argues that No Child Left Behind has not damaged teachers’ opinion of their profession, as many might have expected. In fact, according to Vanderbilt professor Jason A. Grissom, “Over the time spanning the implementation of No Child Left Behind, the Read more about Teachers Happier with NCLB Than Many Would Think[…]

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State Oversight of District-Designed Teacher-Evaluation Systems

In 2011, President Barack Obama and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan provided states with flexibility from certain requirements under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, or ESEA, currently known as the No Child Left Behind Act. The flexibility process requires states to develop and implement new educator-evaluation systems to help identify effective teachers. While some Read more about State Oversight of District-Designed Teacher-Evaluation Systems[…]

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Hess and Kelly: What should a federal education agenda look like?

In a time when the Obama Administration’s tenure is winding down and when Congress has yet to make any significant progress toward a remake of ESEA, some measured thoughts about the role of the federal government in American education are quite timely. Frederick M. Hess and Andrew P. Kelly, of the American Enterprise Institute, have Read more about Hess and Kelly: What should a federal education agenda look like?[…]

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What will Congress do on Education this year?

Education Week recently conducted two very helpful interviews with prominent members of Congress who deal with education, one from each side of the aisle.  These interviews allow Rep. George Miller, D-California and Rep. John Kline, R-Minnesota to offer their predictions on the education agenda for Congress in 2014.  Although Kline, the Republican, is more optimistic Read more about What will Congress do on Education this year?[…]

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A Rollback on ED waivers

For the last two years, the Education Department has been using waivers to grant states lenience in the face of the looming repercussions of No Child Left Behind (2001). This process seems likely to continue until Congress does a re-write of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the most recent version of which is NCLB. Read more about A Rollback on ED waivers[…]

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Advocacy Groups Ask Duncan For More Rigorous Waiver Reviews

In lieu of Congress re-authorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the most recent version of which is No Child Left Behind (2001), the Education Department under Arne Duncan has used waivers to allow states to avoid the repercussions associated with not meeting the demands of NCLB. This is essential because no state is really Read more about Advocacy Groups Ask Duncan For More Rigorous Waiver Reviews[…]

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Testing and ESEA Reauthorization: The Moment of Truth

Linda Darling-Hammond, John Jackson, and Marc Tucker are calling for renewed attention to assessment in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Schools Act, of which the most recent iteration is No Child Left Behind. They write: The next version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) should require the use of tests that Read more about Testing and ESEA Reauthorization: The Moment of Truth[…]

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ED Attaches More Strings to NCLB Waiver Renewals

Michele McNeil at Education Week describes in a recent article how the Education Department, under Secretary Arne Duncan, continues to use NCLB waivers to enforce its policy goals.  The situation, which we have blogged about before here and here, is essentially that Congress has yet to pass a new version of the Elementary and Secondary Read more about ED Attaches More Strings to NCLB Waiver Renewals[…]

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Waivers for States, Waivers for Districts?

The Obama administration recently approved eight California school districts (Fresno Unified, Long Beach Unified, Los Angeles Unified, Oakland Unified, Sacramento City Unified, San Francisco Unified, Sanger Unified, and Santa Ana Unified) for a one year district waiver from No Child Left Behind (NCLB), in exchange for locally developed plans to prepare all students for college Read more about Waivers for States, Waivers for Districts?[…]

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The ESEA Rewrites in the Works

Originally signed into law by President George W. Bush on January 8, 2002, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) technically expired in 2007. On several occasions over the last few years, various attempts have been made by both political parties in Congress to rewrite the law, but they ultimately fell short. Since 2012, President Read more about The ESEA Rewrites in the Works[…]

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