Issue Brief: Meeting the Needs of the Gifted Learner

According to the Office of Civil Rights within the U.S. Education Department, there are approximately 3.2 million students in public schools in gifted and talented programs.  Although Federal law acknowledges that children with gifts and talents have unique needs that are not traditionally offered in regular school settings, it offers no specific provisions, mandates, or Read more about Issue Brief: Meeting the Needs of the Gifted Learner[…]

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Is There a Gifted Gap?

Schools have long failed to cultivate the innate talents of many of their young people, particularly high-ability girls and boys from disadvantaged and minority backgrounds. This failure harms the economy, widens income gaps, arrests upward mobility, and exacerbates civic decay and political division. To address these issues, researchers Christopher Yaluma and Adam Tyner of the Read more about Is There a Gifted Gap?[…]

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Fully Developing the Potential of Academically Advanced Students

A new AEI paper by Jonathan Wai and Frank C. Worrell, “Fully Developing the Potential of Academically Advanced Students: Helping Them Will Help Society” argues that gifted students are often left out of education reform conversations. In the $59.8 billion 2015 federal education budget, one dollar was spent on gifted and talented education for every Read more about Fully Developing the Potential of Academically Advanced Students[…]

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High Stakes for High Achievers: State Accountability in the Age of ESSA

No Child Left Behind meant well, but it had a pernicious flaw: It created strong incentives for schools to focus all their energy on helping low-performing students get over a modest “proficiency” bar. Meanwhile, it ignored the educational needs of high achievers, who were likely to pass state reading and math tests regardless of what Read more about High Stakes for High Achievers: State Accountability in the Age of ESSA[…]

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ESSA Accountability: Don’t Forget the High Achievers

In the early days of the accountability movement, Jeb Bush’s Florida developed an innovative approach to evaluating school quality. First, the state looked at individual student progress over time—making it one of the first to do so. Then it put special emphasis on the gains (or lack thereof) of the lowest-performing kids in the state. Read more about ESSA Accountability: Don’t Forget the High Achievers[…]

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When Top Students Drop: Why Even Good Schools Need to Grow

Over a the past several months Real Clear Education has been spotlighting schools and teachers participating in the Opportunity Culture initiative, a movement launched in 2011 by education policy and consulting firm Public Impact. Opportunity Culture models are aimed at improving the quality of education by extending the reach of excellent teachers and their teams, encouraging teacher Read more about When Top Students Drop: Why Even Good Schools Need to Grow[…]

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State of the States Report says Gifted and Talented Children are Overlooked

A recent survey and report conducted on the State of the State in Gifted Education by both the National Association for Gifted Children and the Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted released some surprising information on the (sometimes inadequate) plans, laws, and services in place for gifted and talented children across the Read more about State of the States Report says Gifted and Talented Children are Overlooked[…]

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September Issue Brief: Equity Issues in Education

Statistics tell us that despite 61 years of integration and attention to equity, not much has changed in many parts of the United States. Students in high-poverty schools lack the supports needed to become college ready, and school districts that serve the highest percentages of low-income students and students of color receive significantly less in Read more about September Issue Brief: Equity Issues in Education[…]

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The Bright Students Left Behind

Chester E. Finn Jr. And Brandon L. Wright of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute have recently written a preview article in the Wall Street Journal for their forthcoming book, “Failing Our Brightest Kids: The Global Challenge of Educating High-Ability Students.” The article inverts the typical narrative of a focus on equity, and asks if we Read more about The Bright Students Left Behind[…]

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