The Return: How Should Education Leaders Prepare for Reentry and Beyond?

The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy and Chiefs for Change released a report that outlines relevant research and provides key recommendations for reopening K-12 schools when public health officials deem it is safe to do so. A bipartisan network of state and district education leaders, Chiefs for Change, turned to the Institute for its Read more about The Return: How Should Education Leaders Prepare for Reentry and Beyond?[…]

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Apprenticeship Programs Are Rapidly Growing in New Industries

Between 2013 and 2018, the number of apprenticeship programs in the U.S. more than doubled, and the U.S. Department of Labor reports that the return on investment of apprenticeship programs is 147%. Although apprenticeships have long been viewed as for blue-collar industries, tech companies and small businesses in a variety of industries are increasingly adopting Read more about Apprenticeship Programs Are Rapidly Growing in New Industries[…]

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Achievement Quandaries

Recently, Chester Finn reflected on a new study which finds that achievement gaps have not closed in the last 50 years and educational improvements have not been seen at the high school level. Excerpts appear below: An ambitious, important new piece of analysis in Education Next concludes that young Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum have Read more about Achievement Quandaries[…]

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Creating Seamless Credit Transfer: A Parallel Higher Ed System

Writing for The Christensen Institute, authors Michael Horn and Richard Price explore the options for improving transfer of credits between higher education institutions. Excerpts of their piece appear below: In an era of increasing data interoperability in almost every sector of life, the idea that today’s students can’t seamlessly transfer credits from one institution to Read more about Creating Seamless Credit Transfer: A Parallel Higher Ed System[…]

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Prepare Now for a a Precipitous ‘COVID Slide’ Next Year

NWEA has announced projections that suggest current school closures due to the COVID-19 global pandemic could result in dramatic learning loss for students. The research, conducted by NWEA’s Collaborative for Student Growth Research Center, leverages previous NWEA research on summer learning loss and uses a national sample of over five million students in grades 3-8 Read more about Prepare Now for a a Precipitous ‘COVID Slide’ Next Year[…]

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How are school districts adapting teacher work policies for emergency closures?

Understandably, the sudden closure of schools has been both immeasurably difficult and confusing for students and adults alike. The first priority for most school districts has been ensuring the safety and nutrition of their students, but now the focus is increasingly on how to keep students learning–and that requires forging teacher policies to address issues Read more about How are school districts adapting teacher work policies for emergency closures?[…]

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NC3T – Preparing Our Students for the Real World: The Education Shift Our Children and Future Demand

The National Center for College and Career Transitions (NC3T) has released a new position paper, arguing for Career Connected Learning as a strategy for engaging students and preparing them to thrive in the adult world. Written by Hans Meeder and Brett Pawlowski, this piece provides education decision-makers and stakeholders with a sweeping look at the Read more about NC3T – Preparing Our Students for the Real World: The Education Shift Our Children and Future Demand[…]

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Reimagining the Workforce Development and Employment System for the 21st Century and Beyond

Recognizing the value of interdisciplinary collaboration and systems thinking, RAND Corporation researchers, supported by RAND Corporation investment funds, have  developed a systems-level, blue-sky approach to conceptualizing and visualizing a 21st-century U.S. workforce development and employment system. A new report from RAND is the first step in moving the United States to a system that accounts Read more about Reimagining the Workforce Development and Employment System for the 21st Century and Beyond[…]

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Education Policy Approaches to Trauma-Informed Practices

A new two-page policy outline from Education Commission of the States serves as an introduction to trauma-informed practices, as defined in state education policy. Trauma-informed practices intersect with school discipline, student health, educator training, school safety, and more.  There are four categories of recent state policy action, including Educator and School Staff Training, Task Forces/Committees, Read more about Education Policy Approaches to Trauma-Informed Practices[…]

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America’s Growing Demand for Information Technology and Computer Science

Excel in Ed and Code.org have teamed up to bring a new report focusing on the demand of the U.S. workforce for graduates skilled in information technology and computer science. Companies are struggling to find workers with information technology (IT) and computer science (CS) skills to fill hundreds of thousands of jobs.  While the demand Read more about America’s Growing Demand for Information Technology and Computer Science[…]

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Achieve’s Graduating Ready Data Explorer

Achieve’s Data Explorer seeks to provide clear information about high school pathways, graduation requirements, and the differences across states. The site includes the details of the options and requirements for graduation in every state.  As you dig into the data, you’ll see that states are offering an increasing variety of graduation options and pathways to Read more about Achieve’s Graduating Ready Data Explorer[…]

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Low-Hanging Fruit: How Automatic Enrollment in Advanced Coursework is Leveling the Playing Field

PIE Network members in Colorado, North Carolina, and Washington State recently shared details about automatic enrollment policies (also known as academic acceleration), which ensure that students with qualifying test scores in a particular subject are automatically enrolled in advanced coursework in the same subject area. As a result, more students who have proven they’re ready Read more about Low-Hanging Fruit: How Automatic Enrollment in Advanced Coursework is Leveling the Playing Field[…]

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To Usher In an ‘Age of Agility’ in Education, We Must Talk Less About Schools – and More About Students

Writing for The 74, Beth Hawkins recently reviewed innovations that shake up the high school to college pipeline emerging from the symposium celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Center on Reinventing Public Education. Excerpts of the piece appear below: The symposium explored ways in which the traditional concept of school could be challenged, pushing particularly Read more about To Usher In an ‘Age of Agility’ in Education, We Must Talk Less About Schools – and More About Students[…]

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49 of 50 States Now Enable Competency-Based Education

The Aurora Institute (previously iNACOL) released the updated CompetencyWorks map, a snapshot of K-12 competency education state policy across the United States. Since 2012, iNACOL’s CompetencyWorks initiative has published an annual snapshot map of the United States, categorizing states into levels at which their policy environments and state activities support competency-based education. In 2012, nearly Read more about 49 of 50 States Now Enable Competency-Based Education[…]

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Associate Degrees and Certificates are More Valuable Than you may Think

As its name suggests, the middle-skills pathway sits between a high school diploma and a bachelor’s degree. There are a wide variety of credentials associated with this pathway, but certificates and associate degrees are the most popular. In general, associate degrees include a mix of general education courses and career preparation, while certificates are almost Read more about Associate Degrees and Certificates are More Valuable Than you may Think[…]

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Early College High Schools May Pay for Themselves in the Long Run

Some solutions in education are expensive. Take early college high schools, which give students a head start on their college degrees but cost about $3,800 extra per student. Are they worth it? New research suggests that these schools might actually pay for themselves in long-term benefits to both students and the public as a whole. Read more about Early College High Schools May Pay for Themselves in the Long Run[…]

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